“Let it all out theory” still holds

I am not exactly held hostage by social media in its manifold manifestations, but I need to monitor various sites in order to do my job. I rely on Twitter in particular on state legislative session days to keep up with votes, for the days when I choose not to chain myself to the session’s live feed. But the trouble with Twitter and its cultural cousins is that the Send button is right there, just begging for my commentary and tart replies.

Today is one of those days.

For sanity’s sake, I’m recalling something I posted a little over five years ago. I quoted a writer whose plain sense I need to keep in mind whenever a site’s Send option is all too tempting.

Some say I repress my anger, and I reply, You betcha. I have never had much patience for the “let-it-all-out” theory. I know several people who are forever letting it all out, and their spirits remain consistently unimproved.

Michael Perry in Backpacker magazine, June 2003

Of course that depends on what one is letting out. But I take Mr. Perry’s point.

On the let-it-all-out theory

There are a lot of would-be Facebook posts and tweets in my digital shredder. These post-election days are not bringing out my best. Some little angel on my shoulder is keeping me from hitting the Send button too often. I know these are serious times, but I can’t help but laugh at myself for having so many opinions and snappy replies that simply must (not) get out there.

I’m reminded of something I read years ago by Michael Perry in Backpacker magazine, of all places. My commonplacing notebook says this is from the June 2003 issue.

Some say I repress my anger, and I reply, You betcha. I have never had much patience for the “let-it-all-out” theory. I know several people who are forever letting it all out, and their spirits remain consistently unimproved.

Hello, social media.

Here’s to consistent improvement – and here’s to avoiding that Send button.

This post was shared with Theology is a Verb and Reconciled to You.